Your question: Can you dive with a stuffy nose?

Can you scuba dive with a cold?

Any diver, proud to be so, knows ears, nose, and lungs have to work properly, otherwise, it could be an important drawback. Diving with a cold would not allow you to compensate during the descend. On the other hand, reverse-compression could happen on the way back up. So, diving with a cold is not recommended.

How do I clear my sinuses for diving?

If so, you can also try nasal saline spray. Make sure to read the bottle and verify that it is natural saline spray and that it is free of any medications. A couple of squirts up each nostril before you dive may irrigate your sinuses enough to provide relief and allow you to equalize them efficiently.

Is a stuffy nose considered congestion?

Nasal congestion or “stuffy nose” occurs when nasal and adjacent tissues and blood vessels become swollen with excess fluid, causing a “stuffy” plugged feeling. Nasal congestion may or may not include a nasal discharge or “runny nose.” Nasal congestion usually is just an annoyance for older children and adults.

Can you take a decongestant before scuba diving?

Nasal decongestants are generally not a good idea under water: most wear off too rapidly and you may wind up with a ‘rebound’ effect, and in worse condition than when you started. People who require decongestants in order to dive are already at increased risk of injury due to higher pressure (barotrauma).

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What happens if you cough while scuba diving?

If the cough has a metallic taste, or if you experience shortness of breath accompanied by a feeling of liquid rising from the back of your throat, discontinue the dive and seek immediate medical help. These are symptoms of a rare but serious condition called immersion pulmonary edema (IPE).

Why is diving with a cold bad?

A relentlessly blocked-up head is unsafe for scuba. You won’t be able to clear your ears and sinuses while descending. Worse, at the end of your dive, it elevates your risk for a reverse squeeze on your way back up. … A little scratchiness is OK, but if you’re struggling to swallow, cancel the dive.

When should you not scuba dive?

Make Sure You’re Fit to Dive

You will be required to sign a medical statement before learning to dive. If you’re already certified to dive, avoid diving if you’re not feeling one hundred percent. In particular, don’t dive if you’ve got a head cold or a hangover. Save the party for the end of your diving trip.

Why do my sinuses hurt when I dive?

The most common disorder seen among divers is ear barotrauma. During the descent, increases in ambient pressure can lead to mucosal engorgement and edema. This can cause a blockage of the sinus ostia, trapping fluid in the sinus cavity, and ultimately increasing intrasinus pressure.

How do you clear your sinuses?

Home Treatments

  1. Use a humidifier or vaporizer.
  2. Take long showers or breathe in steam from a pot of warm (but not too hot) water.
  3. Drink lots of fluids. …
  4. Use a nasal saline spray. …
  5. Try a Neti pot, nasal irrigator, or bulb syringe. …
  6. Place a warm, wet towel on your face. …
  7. Prop yourself up. …
  8. Avoid chlorinated pools.
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How long do stuffy noses last?

Although it might feel like longer, nasal congestion usually lasts around five to 10 days, depending on whether it is caused by a viral or bacterial infection.

How do you stay calm while scuba diving?

If you feel anxious underwater, give yourself compassionate and kind thoughts. Remind yourself that you are safe and in control of the situation. Tell yourself that you are strong and adventurous and you can do it. Notice your surroundings and remind yourself of how amazing it is to be underwater!