How long should my water ski be?

How long should slalom water skis be?

Slalom Ski Size Chart

Lbs. – Weight 26-30 MPH 30-34 MPH
Under 100 59″ 59″
100-110 61″-64″ 61“-64”
105-120 61″-66″ 61″-64″
115-140 61″-66″ 61″-66″

What happens if your skis are too short?

Shorter skis are not easier to turn! Having skis that are too short to support your weight will have a lack of control, lack of response or rebound, and will not absorb the vibration when at a higher speed.

Should older skiers use shorter skis?

The older you are the shorter your skis should be. … If you are more interested in balance and speed control than you are in speed you want to consider a shorter ski. If you prefer to ski slower, select a shorter ski with a smaller turning radius.

What should I look for when buying a slalom water ski?

The two most important things to consider are your weight and the speed at which you usually ski.

  1. Sizing Charts. Your weight and boat speed play a factor in how the slalom water ski performs. …
  2. Skill Level. When considering the make of a slalom water ski, choose one to match your skill level. …
  3. Bindings/Boots. …
  4. Fin System.
IT IS INTERESTING:  Frequent question: What size paddle do I need for a 10 foot kayak?

How do I know if skis are too short?

The ski is too short when it fails to provide the float YOU WANT, and a longer model in that ski will provide that float. IMHO, a ski is too soft, not too short, when it folds up on you. In the old days, circa 1983, longer skis were needed for stability, with a noticeable difference between lengths differing by 5 cm.

What happens if your cross country skis are too short?

Get it too short and you will get good grip, but that same grip (be it wax or fishscales) will be dragging on the snow all the time slowing you down (and quickly abrading the kick wax off the skis).

Should my skis be taller than me?

The correct length of skis will vary from skier to skier based on many factors, including but not limited to height and weight. The general rule is to pick a ski that is going to land somewhere between your chin and the top of your head. Pro and expert skiers may choose skis that are slightly taller than their height.