Best answer: Can you scuba dive with a stuffy nose?

Can you scuba dive with a cold?

Any diver, proud to be so, knows ears, nose, and lungs have to work properly, otherwise, it could be an important drawback. Diving with a cold would not allow you to compensate during the descend. On the other hand, reverse-compression could happen on the way back up. So, diving with a cold is not recommended.

What medical conditions can stop you from scuba diving?

Medical conditions such as asthma, diabetes and many cardiac conditions were long considered absolute contraindications to scuba diving.

How do I clear my sinuses before scuba diving?

Nasal Saline Spray

A couple of squirts up each nostril before you dive may irrigate your sinuses enough to provide relief and allow you to equalize them efficiently. One downside is that nasal sprays may not always reach all the way into the sinuses.

Can you take a decongestant before scuba diving?

Nasal decongestants are generally not a good idea under water: most wear off too rapidly and you may wind up with a ‘rebound’ effect, and in worse condition than when you started. People who require decongestants in order to dive are already at increased risk of injury due to higher pressure (barotrauma).

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What happens if you cough while scuba diving?

If the cough has a metallic taste, or if you experience shortness of breath accompanied by a feeling of liquid rising from the back of your throat, discontinue the dive and seek immediate medical help. These are symptoms of a rare but serious condition called immersion pulmonary edema (IPE).

Why is diving with a cold bad?

A relentlessly blocked-up head is unsafe for scuba. You won’t be able to clear your ears and sinuses while descending. Worse, at the end of your dive, it elevates your risk for a reverse squeeze on your way back up. … A little scratchiness is OK, but if you’re struggling to swallow, cancel the dive.

When should you not scuba dive?

Make Sure You’re Fit to Dive

You will be required to sign a medical statement before learning to dive. If you’re already certified to dive, avoid diving if you’re not feeling one hundred percent. In particular, don’t dive if you’ve got a head cold or a hangover. Save the party for the end of your diving trip.

Why you should not scuba dive?

Not to frighten you, but these risks include decompression sickness (DCS, the “bends”), arterial air embolism, and of course drowning. … There are also effects of diving, such as nitrogen narcosis, that can contribute to the cause of these problems.

What is the first symptom of sinus squeeze?

Pressure or pain in the forehead or around the teeth, cheeks, or eyes may occur. The nose may bleed. Pressure and pain increase with increased diving depth due to swelling of the lining of the sinus (mucosal lining) and also bleeding into the sinus.

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Why does my nose bleed when I scuba dive?

Sinus barotraumas are among the most common diving injuries. When the paranasal sinuses fail to equalize to barometric changes during vertical travel, damage to the sinus can cause sharp facial pain with postnasal drip or a nosebleed after surfacing.

What is the most important rule of scuba diving?

If you remember one rule of scuba diving, make it this: Breathe continuously and never hold your breath. During open water certification, a scuba diver is taught that the most important rule in scuba diving is to breathe continuously and to avoid holding his breath underwater.

How do you stay calm while scuba diving?

If you feel anxious underwater, give yourself compassionate and kind thoughts. Remind yourself that you are safe and in control of the situation. Tell yourself that you are strong and adventurous and you can do it. Notice your surroundings and remind yourself of how amazing it is to be underwater!