Can you scuba dive with sinus problems?

Can you scuba dive with sinus congestion?

A relentlessly blocked-up head is unsafe for scuba. You won’t be able to clear your ears and sinuses while descending. Worse, at the end of your dive, it elevates your risk for a reverse squeeze on your way back up. A forehead that feels like a plate of steamers is another no-dive symptom, says Knafelc.

What medical conditions can stop you from scuba diving?

Medical conditions such as asthma, diabetes and many cardiac conditions were long considered absolute contraindications to scuba diving.

How do I stop my sinus squeeze when diving?

Treat allergies and underlying sinus conditions before diving or flying, and make sure you descend and ascend slowly using Valsalva maneuvers (swallowing or yawning on an airplane) to equalize pressure.

Can you dive with rhinitis?

We avoid to go diving when we have allergy symptoms. Hydration is extremely important. We drink a small amount of water as often as possible. If we don’t replenish the water we speedily lose during our dive, our nasal mucus will soon become dense and sticky and will make our equalization difficult.

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When should you not scuba dive?

If you’re generally fit and healthy, there should be no problem. You will be required to sign a medical statement before learning to dive. If you’re already certified to dive, avoid diving if you’re not feeling one hundred percent. In particular, don’t dive if you’ve got a head cold or a hangover.

Does scuba diving affect blood pressure?

Scuba diving can be a great way to keep fit and provide a workout for your heart. However, diving can have significant effects on the body, including increasing blood pressure, which could pose a risk when diving, or a risk to your health in general.

Can I scuba dive with high blood pressure?

As long blood pressure is controlled; exercise capacity is unaffected; and the heart, brain, kidneys and blood vessels are not damaged so as to impose risk of sudden incapacitation, diving is not a problem.

Why you should not scuba dive?

Not to frighten you, but these risks include decompression sickness (DCS, the “bends”), arterial air embolism, and of course drowning. … There are also effects of diving, such as nitrogen narcosis, that can contribute to the cause of these problems.

How can I unblock my sinuses?

Home Treatments

  1. Use a humidifier or vaporizer.
  2. Take long showers or breathe in steam from a pot of warm (but not too hot) water.
  3. Drink lots of fluids. …
  4. Use a nasal saline spray. …
  5. Try a Neti pot, nasal irrigator, or bulb syringe. …
  6. Place a warm, wet towel on your face. …
  7. Prop yourself up. …
  8. Avoid chlorinated pools.

Why do I spit blood after diving?

You may notice some blood mixed with mucus and saliva in your mask after surfacing. You might not have been aware of it while diving. Minor bleeding that drips from the nose (technically not a nosebleed) or from the nose to the throat is typical of sinus barotrauma.

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Why do my sinuses hurt when I dive?

The most common disorder seen among divers is ear barotrauma. During the descent, increases in ambient pressure can lead to mucosal engorgement and edema. This can cause a blockage of the sinus ostia, trapping fluid in the sinus cavity, and ultimately increasing intrasinus pressure.