Best answer: Are Bent over rows bad for you?

Is bent over rowing bad for your back?

The Barbell Row, or Barbell Bent-Over Row, is a strength exercise that works the back muscles. It’s a challenging lift to perform, but it’s one of the most effective exercises for building back strength and size if done correctly.

What is bent-over row good for?

The bent over row is a multi-jointed exercise that recruits several different muscles. It improves strength in the upper and lower back, glutes, hamstrings, lats, and shoulders.

Should you bent-over row?

The bent-over barbell row, specifically with a barbell, is one of the best strength- and muscle-building movements. It allows the lifter to use more weight relative to other rowing movements. It also recruits the forearm and biceps muscles, which leads to a stronger grip.

How many bent over rows should I do?

Bent-Over Barbell Row: 4 sets of 10-15 reps, with 1 minute rest between each set. Underhand Bent-Over Barbell Row: 4 sets of 10-15 reps, with 1 minute rest between each set.

Why does my back hurt during bent-over row?

If your back hurts when you bend over, you should assess the severity of the pain. If you’re experiencing minor pain, it may be due to a muscle spasm or strain. If you’re experiencing serious pain, you may be suffering from a herniated disc or other back injury.

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Are rows better than pull ups?

Rows work your latissimus dorsi more than pull-ups. Out of all of the row variations, the inverted row works your latissimus dorsi the most.

How many calories does bent over rows burn?

How many calories can you burn from using the rowing machine? According to Harvard Health, a 125-pound person can burn 255 calories in 30 minutes of a vigorous rowing workout. A 155-pound person can burn 316 calories, while a 185-pound person can burn 377.

Do bent over rows work core?

As a compound exercise using free weights, the bent-over row works many muscle groups. … Additionally, your legs and core — the abdominal and lower back muscles — contract to stabilize, or keep your body in place, while performing the exercise.